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Teaching House Nomads Blog | June 27, 2019

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About Sherry Ott

Sherry Ott

Sherry is a long-term traveler, blogger, and photographer who did her CELTA at Teaching House, got a job teaching in Vietnam, and hasn’t stopped moving since. She writes about her around-the-world adventures on Ott’s World and is a co-founder of Meet, Plan, Go!, a website and travel event teaching people how to take their own traveling career break or sabbatical.

Posts By Sherry Ott

Challenges of a Middle Aged TEFL Teacher

February 29, 2016 | 6

I looked around the teacher lounge as I frantically tried to prepare for my next class and remind myself what … Read More

Missing the Old, Embracing the New: A Food Adventure

January 18, 2015 |

It’s inevitable: at some point living overseas, it’s going to happen. You will miss home. Living overseas can be absolutely … Read More

Overcoming Fear: Driving a Motorbike in Vietnam

October 2, 2014 | 3

There is a motorbike in my living room. No, I didn’t drive it through the wall. I put it there … Read More

Becoming a TEFL Teacher

April 8, 2014 | 3

I think I have successfully adopted the image of a teacher; I grade with a red pen, I’m often covered in whiteboard marker dust and I lecture my students when they are late. I feel like I have turned into my 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Sawyer — minus the frumpy hair bun.

I’ve been teaching English in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam now for 5 months and it’s had its ups and downs. It was hard work at first, adjusting to my new role, but it’s been getting easier and easier, the more time I spend in the classroom. However, I’m still rapidly trying to learn the rules of English grammar most days and constantly reading up to stay one step ahead of my students. I wonder if I ever learned any of these grammar rules when I was in school or if it was simply a matter of learning from exposure.

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Redefining Normal in Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam

February 24, 2014 | 5

(A Day in the Life of an English Teacher)

It has only taken three short months for my definition of ‘normal’ to change. Once you live in a foreign culture for a while, you adapt to their definition of normal in order to get by and make it through each day.  As I go through a typical day living and working in Ho Chi Minh City, I often wonder what my friends in the US would think – would they think this was normal? I’ll let you decide.

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